Chapter 4: Character Options

What makes a hero?” I ask. Is it arms and a will to use them? Is it a certain heritage, a certain disposition? Is it a divine right to victory? I know this to be not true. I have killed many heroes on the battlefield, and I’ve respected every one. They have many different faces, and deserve remembrance. What makes a hero is their willingness to sacrifice for something they believe in. Anyone can be a hero, once they find something worth dying for.

—Sunbreaker Olomon

The sprawling lands and endless challenges of Exandria forge heroes and villains of many different stripes. The myriad dangers of this wild continent constantly encroach upon innocents in need of protection, even as the legends and the magic of the past challenge those brave enough to reshape the world—for good or ill. The material in this chapter offers a number of new options for player characters to define who they are and what they wish to become.

The character options in this book are useful for players and Dungeon Masters alike, allowing adventurers and NPCs to take starring and supporting roles in your Wildemount D&D campaign. In this chapter, you’ll find stories and statistics that tie the races of the Player’s Handbook and the broader world of D&D to the lands of Wildemount, as well as new subclasses, new backgrounds, and new spells focused on an esoteric study of magic known as dunamancy.

The races, classes, and magic presented in this chapter might have different origins or defy the expectations established in other D&D books. The information in this chapter is specific to Wildemount, and in some cases, to the wider world of Exandria. If something in this book differs from what’s presented in the Player’s Handbook, this material takes precedence in a Wildemount campaign.

Races

The nations of Wildemount are populated by people of many different races. All the races present in the Player’s Handbook, as well as many of the other races of the D&D game, have a home in Wildemount. However, some of those races have cultures that differ from those of their kin elsewhere in the multiverse. This chapter provides cultural information about the common races of Wildemount, plus several subraces not found in the Player’s Handbook.

This section also includes information on what a typical character from each of the major regions of Wildemount—the Dwendalian Empire, the Menagerie Coast, and Xhorhas—might think of the members of each race. Although some of these accounts are accurate, others represent skewed perceptions or stereotypes. Many such perceptions have some basis in truth, but that truth has often been distorted by hearsay, prejudice, propaganda, or cultural misunderstandings.

In addition to the races of the Player’s Handbook, Wildemount is home to many other races, including the following:

Aarakocra, bird-like humanoids who roost on isolated mountaintops

Aasimar, beings who gain supernatural power from the angelic spark in their souls

Firbolgs, forest guardians who engage in peaceful methods to protect their homes

Genasi, humanoids imbued with elemental power as a result of their birth

Goblins, outcast scavengers descended from the experiments of a dark god

Goliaths, hulking wanderers who dwell atop the highest mountains

Kenku, accursed corvine humanoids who can speak only using mimicry

Tortles, tortoise-like humanoids with an innate connection to the sea

The dominant races of Wildemount—dwarves, elves, halflings, and humans—are presented first in this section, followed by the less common races in alphabetical order.

Dwarves

Dwarves’ long memories give them uncommon insight into the world of the past. However, this connection to the past can make their societies resistant to change, even when change is desperately needed.

Dwarves in the Dwendalian Empire

Most folk in the Dwendalian Empire think of dwarves as greedy, cave-dwelling hermits with a passion only for jewelry, drinking, and fighting. Most dwarves in the empire come from the city-state of Grimgolir and its settlements under the Dunrock Mountains, whose miners, jewelers, and warriors are some of the finest in the empire.

Imperial beer, particularly smooth, sweet Trost ale from Trostenwald, is a delicacy among Grimgol dwarves. The people who lived beneath the mountains never grew wheat or hops, and so never brewed beer. Until the dwarves began trading with humans from the long-fallen Julous Dominion, dwarven liquor was a potent, ugly-smelling spirit called rütga, distilled from heavy root vegetables.

Dwarves on the Menagerie Coast

Along the Menagerie Coast, most folk see dwarves as foreigners possessed of fiery passions and an eagerness for action. Dwarves are uncommon visitors on the coast, with most coming from the distant realms of Tal’Dorei and Marquet as sailors or travelers, as pirates from the notorious Revelry, or as soldiers from the Dwendalian Empire.

Ancient legends tell of dwarves living in mountaintop citadels in the ominous Cyrios Mountains, performing strange rituals that call upon the power of the Storm Lord. Along the coast, stories of the strong passion and swift judgment of the dwarves are often a product of the legends of these religious zealots. But these beliefs have been strengthened in modern times by the clear-eyed marquis of Port Zoon, Alamads Haddou, who lays down laws in plain language and enacts swift justice by the letter of those laws.

Dwarves in Xhorhas

Dwarves are few and far between in Xhorhas, and those few who remain are known as duergar, or "deep dwarves." Though some duergar have joined with the Kryn Dynasty and dwell on the surface, most live in the ancient tunnels of the Underdark and harbor a deep-seated enmity for the drow.

Duergar insurgents, striking Kryn settlements or seeking hidden paths toward the surface from perhaps a dozen small outposts in the Underdark, are trying to carve out their own underground dominion. Kryn forces have been successful in holding onto their underground territories so far, but many generals fear that the war in the west is drawing more and more soldiers from their fortifications in the Underdark. If duergar aggression is left unchecked, territory might inevitably have to be ceded to the insurgents.

Elves

When Exandria trembled at the gods’ footfalls, the ancient elves of the north pleaded with the Arch Heart to save them from the world’s ending. Corellon did not respond, for it is said that their divine ears still rang with pain after their duel to the death with Gruumsh, the Ruiner. Desperate and panicked, the greatest mages of the elves performed a ritual powerful enough to encase their entire civilization in ice, in hopes of protecting it from the wrath of the warring gods while the elves escaped into the Feywild.

It is said that the ashes of the Calamity still blew upon the breeze when, centuries later, the barriers of ice melted and the elves of Wildemount emerged from the Feywild once more. On their return to the world, they found that their ritual had not held fast. The Calamity had wiped almost all traces of elven civilization from Exandria. With only the ruined husks of their mighty cities still standing, the elves began to rebuild.

Even though the human-majority civilizations of the Dwendalian Empire and the Clovis Concord view elves as reclusive relics of the ancient past, most elves view themselves as newcomers to the world, for their return to Wildemount is only a generation or two removed from the present day. The notable exception are the dark elves of Xhorhas, who have lived in Eastern Wynandir since time immemorial. Still, it is only in the past few centuries that they have abandoned the labyrinthine caverns of the Underdark and emerged to live on the surface.

Elves in the Dwendalian Empire

Though the dark elves of Xhorhas are the subject of imperial propaganda and widespread prejudice, elves of other kinds living within the empire are generally treated as friends and allies. Imperial humans love to revere elves as ethereal, flawless beings, and to express shock when elves reveal the ways that they are all-to similar to humans. Elves who maintain their "exotic mystique" are most likely to become respected members of society, and many hold great social power within cities such as Zadash and Rexxentrum.

Elves on the Menagerie Coast

Elves are commonplace in the Clovis Concord and among the pirates of the Revelry, and people living on this part of the continent most often laugh at tales of elven grace and beauty. "An elf bleeds just like everyone else" is a common saying on the Menagerie Coast, used to dismiss the fanciful sense of wonder common in the Empire—and the saying has evolved into a dismissal of all overwrought tales, even if the idiom doesn’t quite fit. Savvy buyers of curios and souvenirs might say, "Your wares bleed, just like everyone else’s" to a merchant who has exaggerated the quality of their goods.

Most elves on the Menagerie Coast are descended from travelers from the desert continent of Marquet, but this area is also home to two rare subraces of elf. The seas off the coast are inhabited by secluded civilizations of water-breathing sea elves, who trade with underwater enclaves of merfolk. All but the most idealistic or mercenary of these ocean dwellers see the petty squabbles of the "boat-riders" of the surface world as beneath their notice. At another geographic extreme, the moon-worshiping pallid elves of the Cyrios Mountains are new to the world, and are generally viewed with cordial curiosity by the denizens of the Concord’s cities.

Elves in Xhorhas

The largest elf-majority civilization in Wildemount is the Kryn Dynasty of Xhorhas, which is made up primarily of dark elves. The drow of Xhorhas are respectful toward people of all races—including other elves—as they believe that their holy cycle of rebirth allows them to be reborn into non-drow bodies. The empathy to be gained by experiencing life in another body is crucial to their religion and their culture.

Elves who live outside the Luxon’s cycle of rebirth are viewed with pity, for they have not yet seen the true path. Elves who dwell within the Dwendalian Empire are a notable exception, their imperial allegiance earning them only the cold bite of a blade.

Elf Subraces

At the DM’s discretion, players have access to the pallid elf and sea elf subraces described below, in addition to the elf subraces in the Player’s Handbook.

Height and Weight. Here’s how to randomly determine the height and weight of a pallid elf or sea elf, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d10

Height = 4 feet + 6 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 90 + (1d4 × your size modifier)

Pallid Elf

The pallid elves are a mystical and insightful people with skin as pale as the surface of Exandria’s largest moon. They emerged from the Pallid Grove this century and wander the world with childlike curiosity.

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Incisive Sense. You have advantage on Intelligence (Investigation) and Wisdom (Insight) checks.

Blessing of the Moon Weaver. You know the light cantrip. When you reach 3rd level, you can cast the sleep spell once with this trait and regain the ability to do so when you finish a long rest. When you reach 5th level, you can cast the invisibility spell (targeting yourself only) once with this trait and regain the ability to do so when you finish a long rest. Casting these spells with this trait doesn’t require material components. Wisdom is your spell­casting ability for these spells.

Sea Elf

Sea elves are a reclusive and deeply territorial people who have as much in common with merfolk as they do with other elves. Most sea elves view the people of the Clovis Concord—even other elves—with mistrust.

Ability Score Increase. Your Constitution score increases by 1.

Sea Elf Training. You have proficiency with the spear, trident, light crossbow, and net.

Child of the Sea. You have a swimming speed of 30 feet, and you can breathe air and water.

Friend of the Sea. Using gestures and sounds, you can communicate simple ideas with any beast that has an innate swimming speed.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Aquan.

Halflings

Nearly every race in Exandria has an origin myth or two. The stories vary from realm to realm, but it’s clear that Corellon the Arch Heart wove the elves from grass, Moradin the All-Hammer carved the dwarves from earth, and so on. Halflings across Wildemount have no such stories, and no faiths tell of their god creating the small folk. Some speculate that Avandra the Change Bringer placed halflings in the world, but despite some of Ioun’s most devout priests petitioning their god to reveal the truth of the halflings’ creation, the Knowing Mentor has remained infuriatingly coy on the topic.

For their part, halflings in the Dwendalian Empire and the Menagerie Coast don’t much care where they came from. All they know is that they walked out of a hole in the ground one day to find a beautiful world spread out before them. Some longed to explore to that world’s farthest horizons, while others were content to gaze upon the beauty of the same sunrise each morning. Plenty of halflings have joined the Cobalt Soul over the years in desperate search of answers to the world’s big questions—where did we come from, and where are we going? But most halflings are content to leave the questions of past and future well enough alone, simply living in the present.

Halflings in the Dwendalian Empire

Generations ago, the halflings of the Felder clan established a settlement now known as Felderwin Tillage, and discovered in time that they had inadvertently created an agricultural powerhouse. The word "halfling" has been synonymous with a simple, rural lifestyle ever since.

The dutiful, orderly people of the Dwendalian Empire most often think of halflings as carefree country bumpkins. In a nation obsessed with its heritage and its legacy, the stereotypical halfling philosophy of living life in the moment is viewed as pathetically unambitious.

Halflings on the Menagerie Coast

People in this part of the world have no real assumptions about halflings. Most perceive them on a level with humans, having similar ambitions, virtues, and vices. The only difference is that halflings are a wee bit smaller from prow to stern and a fair bit bigger from port to starboard.

Halflings are common enough in the Clovis Concord that just about every vessel, shop, tavern, coffee house, and brothel has been designed with halflings and gnomes in mind. Stairs often have shallow steps for small legs, stools feature hand-cranks to adjust their height up or down, and most restaurants have utensils sized for small hands.

Halflings in Xhorhas

Few Xhorhasians have ever seen a halfling except for the occasional halfling soldier in Dwendalian armor. Because of this, most Kryn citizens view halflings as icons of the empire and are quick to distrust them. Only the Lotusden halflings, a reclusive and insular clan native to the Lotusden Greenwood, call Xhorhas home.

Halfling Subraces

At the DM’s discretion, players have access to the lotusden halfling subrace described below, in addition to the halfling subraces in the Player’s Handbook.

Lotusden Halfling

Long tied to the natural heart of the Lotusden Greenwood, these halflings have adapted to live synergistically with the chaotic laws of the wilds.

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Child of the Wood. You know the druidcraft cantrip. When you reach 3rd level, you can cast the entangle spell once with this trait and regain the ability to do so when you finish a long rest. When you reach 5th level, you can cast the spike growth spell once with this trait and regain the ability to do so when you finish a long rest. Casting these spells with this trait doesn’t require material components. Wisdom is your spellcasting ability for these spells.

Timberwalk. Ability checks made to track you have disadvantage, and you can move across difficult terrain made of nonmagical plants and undergrowth without expending extra movement.

Humans

The most populous race in Wildemount, humans define common culture across the continent. Their unrelenting ambition creates societies that aggressively pursue productivity while valuing leisure, and their short life spans often lead humans to romanticize the ugly past and fear the unknown future.

Humans in the Dwendalian Empire

In the Dwendalian Empire, humans are everywhere and occupy every walk of imperial life.

Humans recoil from the unknown in ways that longer-lived folk do not, and nations dominated by a nonhuman majority are a tremendous source of fear and suspicion to human-majority nations. Human survival instinct stokes the flames of fear, especially when those flames are amply fueled by nationalistic propaganda. Such is the relationship between the Dwendalian Empire and the drow-majority Kryn Dynasty of Xhorhas.

Other societies—including Uthodurn’s pluralistic society of elves and dwarves—are less maligned. However, this is because the average citizen of the empire knows nothing about those societies, reducing them to objects of curiosity for imperial scholars.

Humans on the Menagerie Coast

Within the Clovis Concord, humans are seen as adept diplomats, nation builders, and loyal soldiers. They are the most populous people of the Menagerie Coast, but ever since the founding of the Clovis Concord, that nation has been one defined by its diversity. Although other nations of Wildemount and the world might consider humans to be the definitive, adaptable jacks-of-all-trades, the people of the Concord know that all folk have this capacity.

Humans in Xhorhas

Humans are rare in Xhorhas, and those found within that land typically belong to wandering clans or are soldiers of the Dwendalian Empire. Aside from such soldiers, humans are not viewed with inherent suspicion by most Xhorhasians, but the war between the Kryn Dynasty and the Dwendalian Empire has made Xhorhas an even more dangerous land for all human travelers. Dark elves and monsters that might treat a wandering human with caution elsewhere are likely to attack on sight in Xhorhas, because they know that an imperial human will do the same to them.

Aarakocra

Many people across Wildemount consider the winged aarakocra to be a myth, so infrequently do they descend from their lofty aeries to deal with wingless folk. Where they are known, the aarakocra rarely engage with the land-bound societies of Wildemount, though some take great pleasure in traveling on the open ocean with Concord sailors and Revelry pirates. Some legends say that Melora the Wild Mother created the aarakocra as storm herders who drive the clouds across the sky, and some aarakocra tribes play a sport called h’aara-shie, or “cloud chasing,” that reflects this ancient tale.

Aarakocra in the Dwendalian Empire

Within the empire, most aarakocra keep to the hidden settlement of Vol’antim in the Cyrios Mountains. The appearance of an aarakocra is seen as a blessing in the settlements of the Truscan Vale and the Marrow Valley—often much to the aarakocra’s embarrassment. Most rural folk consider the aarakocra to be angels of Erathis the Law Bearer, no matter how diligently the aarakocra explain otherwise.

Aarakocra on the Menagerie Coast

The few aarakocra who descend from the Cyrios Mountains or emerge from the canopy of the Quoraska Jungle for longer than a day or two are often swept up in the beauty of the sea. Thus enamored, many join a ship’s crew and set out to explore the Lucidian Ocean with their new allies. The common people of the Menagerie Coast look upon the aarakocra’s bright wings with awe and dream about taking to the sky, but are often baffled by their seemingly nonsensical idioms and figures of speech.

Aarakocra in Xhorhas

Aarakocra are native to the mountains and jungles of western Wildemount, and have precious few settlements in the mountains surrounding Xhorhas. The average Kryn dark elf would react to the sight of an aarakocra with shock, for they have neither stories nor experience with such creatures.

Aarakocra Names

As with much of their speech, aarakocra names include clicks, trills, and whistles to the point that other peoples have a difficult time pronouncing them. Typically, a name has two to four syllables with the sounds acting as connectors. When interacting with other races, aarakocra may use nicknames gained from people they meet or shortened forms of their full names.

Aarakocra Names: Aera, Aial, Aur, Deekek, Errk, Heehk, Ikki, Kleeck, Oorr, Ouss, Quaf, Quierk, Salleek, Urreek, or Zeed

Aarakocra Traits

Being able to fly at high speed at 1st level is exceptionally effective in certain circumstances and exceedingly dangerous in others. Keep this in mind before allowing your players to choose this race.

An aarakocra character has the following traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Dexterity score increases by 2, and your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Age. Aarakocra reach maturity by age 3. They don’t usually live longer than 30 years.

Alignment. Most aarakocra are good and rarely choose sides when it comes to law and chaos. Tribal leaders and warriors might be lawful, while explorers and adventurers might tend toward chaotic.

Size. Aarakocra average 5 feet tall and have slender, lightweight bodies. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d8

Height = 4 feet + 3 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 70 + (1d4 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 25 feet.

Flight. You have a flying speed of 50 feet. To use this speed, you can’t be wearing medium or heavy armor.

Talons. Your talons are natural weapons, which you can use to make unarmed strikes. If you hit with them, you deal slashing damage equal to 1d4 + your Strength modifier, instead of the bludgeoning damage normal for an unarmed strike.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Aarakocra, Auran, and Common.

Aasimar

The light of the gods still shines upon Exandria, even from behind the Divine Gate. Aasimar are the purest expression of that divine light as it burns within every mortal soul, for the souls of those blessed with an angelic ancestor blaze brighter than any other. Even rarer than the tieflings with whom they share a commonality of ancestry, aasimar are mortal, and yet are understood to be destined for a grander cosmic purpose than others around them. In every culture across the continent of Wildemount, the birth of an aasimar is seen as a blessing and a portent.

Aasimar who can bear the burden of their destiny become champions of noble causes, and encourage others to walk always in the light. More often than not, however, an aasimar saddled with a vague destiny and the grand aspirations of their clan ultimately falls from grace, their inner light succumbing to shadow.

Aasimar in the Dwendalian Empire

To a law-abiding family worshiping state-approved gods, the birth of an aasimar child is nothing short of a miracle. Such a child is not only promised a charmed life, but elevates the social status of their family. However, to a family that secretly worships gods outlawed by the empire, the birth of a child touched by an angel of such deities is a mixed blessing. If the event draws the scrutiny of a settlement’s idolmaster and their cronies, it might force family members to flee their homes for the Greying Wildlands or the Menagerie Coast.

Aasimar on the Menagerie Coast

In the Clovis Concord, the cosmopolitan melting pot of Wildemount, most folk are inured to the sight of unusual and remarkable people. Even so, aasimar are a sight to behold, and there are many who don’t mind being rude if it means spending a few extra seconds staring at a radiant aasimar as they pass by.

Aasimar in Xhorhas

Those in the Kryn Dynasty who study dunamancy see aasimar as brimming with near-limitless potential. As such, aasimar are often sought out from birth to be trained as dunamancers and echo knights. The tribesfolk who wander Xhorhas see the birth of an aasimar as a message from the gods, and their shamans ascribe meaning to that birth by the conditions of the world. An aasimar born during a raging storm might be a word of warning from Kord the Storm Lord, whereas an aasimar whose mother gave birth in a field of flowers could be a vow of protection from Melora the Wild Mother.

Aasimar Guides

An aasimar, except for one who has turned evil, has a link to an angelic being. That being—usually a deva—provides guidance to the aasimar, though this connection functions only in dreams. As such, the guidance is not a direct command or a simple spoken word. Instead, the aasimar receives visions, prophecies, and feelings.

The angelic being is far from omniscient. Its guidance is based on its understanding of the tenets of law and good, and it might have insight into combating especially powerful evils that it knows about.

As part of fleshing out an aasimar character, consider the nature of that character’s angelic guide. The Angelic Guide and Angelic Nature tables offer names and natures that you can use to flesh out your character’s guide.

Angelic Guide

d6Name
1Tadriel
2Myllandra
3Seraphina
4Galladia
5Mykiel
6Valandras

Angelic Nature

d6Nature
1Bookish and lecturing
2Compassionate and hopeful
3Practical and lighthearted
4Fierce and vengeful
5Stern and judgmental
6Kind and parental

Aasimar Names

Most aasimar are born from human parents. They use the same naming conventions as their native culture.

Aasimar Traits

An aasimar character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Charisma score increases by 2.

Age. Aasimar mature at the same rate as humans, but they can live up to 160 years.

Alignment. Imbued with celestial power, most aasimar are good. Outcast aasimar are most often neutral or even evil.

Size. Aasimar have the same range of height and weight as humans. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d10

Height = 4 feet + 8 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 110 + (2d4 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. Blessed with a radiant soul, your vision can easily cut through darkness. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Celestial Resistance. You have resistance to necrotic damage and radiant damage.

Healing Hands. As an action, you can touch a creature and cause it to regain a number of hit points equal to your level. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Light Bearer. You know the light cantrip. Charisma is your spellcasting ability for it.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Celestial.

Aasimar Subraces

Three subraces for aasimar exist: protector aasimar, scourge aasimar, and fallen aasimar. Choose one of them for your character.

Protector Aasimar

Protector aasimar are charged by the powers of good to protect the weak, to strike at evil wherever it arises, and to stand vigilant against the darkness. From a young age, a protector aasimar receives advice and directives that urge them to stand against evil.

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Radiant Soul. Starting at 3rd level, you can use your action to unleash the divine energy within yourself, causing your eyes to glimmer and two luminous, incorporeal wings to sprout from your back.

Your transformation lasts for 1 minute or until you end it as a bonus action. During it, you have a flying speed of 30 feet, and once on each of your turns, you can deal extra radiant damage to one target when you deal damage to it with an attack or a spell. The extra radiant damage equals your level.

Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Scourge Aasimar

Scourge aasimar are imbued with a divine energy that blazes intensely within them. It feeds a powerful desire to destroy evil—a desire that is, at its best, unflinching and, at its worst, all-consuming. Many scourge aasimar wear masks to block out the world and focus on containing this power, unmasking themselves only in battle.

Ability Score Increase. Your Constitution score increases by 1.

Radiant Consumption. Starting at 3rd level, you can use your action to unleash the divine energy within yourself, causing a searing light to radiate from you, pouring out of your eyes and mouth, and threaten to char you.

Your transformation lasts for 1 minute or until you end it as a bonus action. During it, you shed bright light in a 10-foot radius and dim light for an additional 10 feet, and at the end of each of your turns, you and each creature within 10 feet of you take radiant damage equal to half your level (rounded up). In addition, once on each of your turns, you can deal extra radiant damage to one target when you deal damage to it with an attack or a spell. The extra radiant damage equals your level.

Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Fallen Aasimar

An aasimar who was touched by dark powers as a youth or who turns evil in early adulthood can become one of the fallen—a group of aasimar whose inner light has been replaced by shadow.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 1.

Necrotic Shroud. Starting at 3rd level, you can use your action to unleash the divine energy within yourself, causing your eyes to turn into pools of darkness and two skeletal, ghostly, flightless wings to sprout from your back. The instant you transform, other creatures within 10 feet of you that can see you must each succeed on a Charisma saving throw (DC 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Charisma modifier) or become frightened of you until the end of your next turn.

Your transformation lasts for 1 minute or until you end it as a bonus action. During it, once on each of your turns, you can deal extra necrotic damage to one target when you deal damage to it with an attack or a spell. The extra necrotic damage equals your level.

Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

Dragonborn

Wildemount was the cradle from which all dragonborn civilization grew. The city-state of Draconia rose in the Dreemoth Ravine along the southern edge of the continent, when foreign dragonkin fleeing the gods’ wrath during the Calamity forged an alliance with native dragonborn already dwelling there. The colonizing dragonborn, who called themselves draconbloods, worked with the native dragonborn, called ravenites, to build a society that could withstand the wandering monsters of Xhorhas. However, Draconia swiftly descended into corruption and bigotry, and the draconblood ruling class betrayed and enslaved their ravenite kin.

Twenty years ago, Draconia was destroyed by the ire of the mighty Chroma Conclave, and the city-state’s ruins were occupied by an ancient white dragon named Vorugal. The chaos of the attack upended draconblood civilization, and the ravenite slaves rose up and drove their former masters from the Dreemoth Ravine. Now masters of their own fate, the ravenite dragonborn have rebuilt their home within the ravine and have begun to spread out across the world.

Dragonborn Variants

You can allow a player to choose one of the following dragonborn variants.

Dragonborn Variant: Draconblood

Draconbloods possess long tails and a knack for social manipulation. They remember the days when they were once mighty conquerors.

A draconblood uses the dragonborn traits in the Player’s Handbook, with the following traits replacing the Ability Score Increase and Damage Resistance traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Intelligence score increases by 2, and your Charisma score increases by 1.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Forceful Presence. You can use your understanding of creative diplomacy or intimidation to guide a conversation in your favor. When you make a Charisma (Intimidation or Persuasion) check, you can do so with advantage. Once you use this trait, you can’t do so again until you finish a short or long rest.

Dragonborn Variant: Ravenite

Ravenites have no tails and a hearty physique. They remember the days when they were slaves to the draconblood, as well as the day when they overthrew their masters.

A ravenite uses the dragonborn traits in the Player’s Handbook, with the following traits replacing the Ability Score Increase and Damage Resistance traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Constitution score increases by 1.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Vengeful Assault. When you take damage from a creature in range of a weapon you are wielding, you can use your reaction to make an attack with the weapon against that creature. Once you use this trait, you can’t do so again until you finish a short or long rest.

Dragonborn in the Dwendalian Empire

The Dwendalian Empire has seen a massive influx of dragonborn since the fall of Draconia. Most of the draconblood nobles who fled into the empire tried to use their grandiloquent names and titles to earn favors and prestige. But without the power of a nation-state behind them, many of those former slave owners were forced into lives of farming or hard labor. Some in the empire speak in awed whispers of the "former dragonborn princes" who now live as paupers, while others scoff at these haughty dragonborn’s delusions of grandeur.

Many ravenites have journeyed to the Dwendalian Empire in the years since the death of Vorugal, but the first of those found a colder reception than was given their former masters. The empire had no desire to grant asylum to revolutionaries, and would have turned the ravenites away had the Cerberus Assembly not intervened. For reasons unknown, the Assembly created the shantytown of Talonstadt for displaced ravenites, allowing them to trade labor for lodging there.

Dragonborn on the Menagerie Coast

Many of the draconbloods fleeing their ruined city-state settled among the people of the Clovis Concord. Some had beach homes and private villas to flee to, and were able to establish businesses with the money they had stashed away there. Others were not so fortunate, and were forced to take menial jobs to make ends meet. Many residents of the Clovis Concord feel a twinge of sympathy for the draconblood exiles, but most commoners who have any knowledge of the ravenite uprising see this life of servitude as just punishment.

Many of the ravenites who travel to the warm sands of the coast are merchants or wealthy generals or politicians on vacation. As such, all ravenites on the Menagerie Coast are assumed to have wealth—even exiles or penniless adventurers. Any tailless dragonborn who wanders through the cities of the Clovis Concord must constantly fend off hucksters, peddlers, and thieves.

Dragonborn in Xhorhas

Countless draconbloods fled into the wastes of Xhorhas in search of asylum, and some even dared approach the intimidating walls of Rosohna. The dark elves of the Kryn Dynasty were eager to welcome these formerly isolated people into their ranks—though their reasons for doing so were less than altruistic. More dragonborn living within range of the Luxon’s beacons deepens the well of experiences that drow engaged in anamnesis can draw from, bringing their people closer to true enlightenment. The dark elves have no interest in the rift between the draconbloods and the ravenites, and treat both peoples as equals.

Firbolgs

Firbolgs are a forest-dwelling race native to the Greying Wildlands, particularly the mysterious Savalirwood. Their bodies are covered with thick fur ranging from tones of earthen brown and ruddy red to cool grays and blues, and even to wild hues of pink and green. Their bodies are bovine or camelid in appearance, with floppy, pointed ears and broad, pink noses, but they are bipedal and have hands that can manipulate weapons and objects.

Most firbolgs live in extended family units, and it is unusual to find one living alone. However, they are introverted to the point where they seldom engage with other firbolgs outside the family unit, and firbolgs rarely form their own cities, villages, or even large tribes. Despite this, many firbolgs enjoy visiting other nations’ settlements for a short time for trade, sightseeing, and to visit friends.

Firbolgs in the Dwendalian Empire

Most imperial citizens have never even heard of firbolgs. Stories involving these folk are rare, and typically liken them to the giants, depicting firbolgs as hulking humanoid warriors rather than fur-covered nature lovers. People living in the great crossroads city of Zadash might be familiar with one firbolg in particular: the jolly, eccentric enchanter known as Pumat Sol. This familiarity means that many warm quickly to new firbolgs, albeit after some initial surprise.

Firbolgs on the Menagerie Coast

Since firbolgs are neither prone to travel nor native to the Menagerie Coast, their numbers along Wildemount’s western shores are vanishingly small. The people of the Clovis Concord share the same folk tales of giant-like humanoid firbolgs as the folk of the Dwendalian Empire, and are likewise surprised by their gentle nature when they meet them.

Firbolgs in Xhorhas

Firbolgs who travel southeast from the Greying Wildlands and cross the Dunrock Mountains might find themselves wandering the wastes of Xhorhas. The territorial monsters that prowl the wastes show no pity to unprepared wanderers, and most firbolg families know better than to undertake such a dangerous journey.

With northern Xhorhas firmly under the control of the Kryn Dynasty, the dark elves have saved a number of firbolg travelers from monsters over the years. Enough of those have remained in the wastes for small firbolg communities to develop in Rosohna and other major Kryn cities.

Firbolg Classes

Most firbolgs are druids, rangers, or fighters. Among their kind, these vocations are passed down from one generation to the next. The firbolgs’ magical heritage also expresses itself in other ways; those who become bards preserve the clan’s lore, and firbolg sorcerers defend their communities. Firbolg wizards arise when a clan becomes friendly with elves.

Firbolg rogues are typically scouts tasked with spying on neighboring folk to determine their intentions. They are most common among firbolgs whose homes border human settlements.

Firbolg barbarians are rare except among clans that face constant threats from evil humanoids and other invaders.

Firbolg clerics and paladins are usually dedicated to nature gods, enforcing their will.

Firbolg warlocks are rare, but some clans forge alliances and arcane pacts with powerful fey beings.

Firbolg monks are almost entirely unheard of, though a monastery might take in the young survivors of a devastated firbolg clan.

Firbolg Names

Firbolg adopt elven names when they must deal with outsiders, although the concept of names strikes them as strange. They know the animals and plants of the forest without formal names, and instead identify the forest’s children by their deeds, habits, and other actions.

By the same token, their clan names merely refer to their homes. When dealing with other races, firbolgs refer to their lands by whatever name the surrounding folk use, as a matter of tact and hospitality, but among their own kind they simply call it "home."

Sometimes firbolgs adopt the nicknames or titles outsiders give them under the assumption that those who need names can call them whatever they wish.

Firbolg Traits

A firbolg character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 2, and your Strength score increases by 1.

Age. As humanoids related to the fey, firbolg have long lifespans. A firbolg reaches adulthood around 30, and the oldest of them can live for 500 years.

Alignment. As people who follow the rhythm of nature and see themselves as its caretakers, firbolg are typically neutral good. Evil firbolg are rare and are usually the sworn enemies of the rest of their kind.

Size. Firbolg stand between 7 and 8 feet tall and weigh between 240 and 300 pounds. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d12

Height = 6 feet + 2 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 175 + (2d6 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Firbolg Magic. You can cast detect magic and disguise self with this trait, using Wisdom as your spellcasting ability for them. Once you cast either spell, you can’t cast it again with this trait until you finish a short or long rest. When you use this version of disguise self, you can seem up to 3 feet shorter than normal, allowing you to more easily blend in with humans and elves.

Hidden Step. As a bonus action, you can magically turn invisible until the start of your next turn or until you attack, make a damage roll, or force someone to make a saving throw. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Powerful Build. You count as one size larger when determining your carrying capacity and the weight you can push, drag, or lift.

Speech of Beast and Leaf. You have the ability to communicate in a limited manner with beasts and plants. They can understand the meaning of your words, though you have no special ability to understand them in return. You have advantage on all Charisma checks you make to influence them.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common, Elvish, and Giant.

Genasi

Genasi are exceedingly rare on Exandria, as befits their unique origins. Most live among the elementally attuned Ashari tribes of Tal’Dorei or on the Elemental Planes. However, there are no major rifts to the Elemental Planes in Wildemount, and thus no Ashari to safeguard them. The few genasi who dwell on this continent are often created as the result of a powerful elemental influence at the moment of their birth. A baby born within the eye of a hurricane might become an air genasi, while a fire genasi might be born in the midst of a raging forest fire.

Some genasi are more attuned to their native element than others. A genasi with a powerful connection to elemental fire might have their head covered by crackling flames rather than hair. A genasi with a connection to elemental water might have blue-tinged skin and appear to sweat profusely at all times.

Genasi in the Dwendalian Empire

Genasi are so visually distinctive and uncommon that they are treated with equal amounts of surprise and wonder in all the nations of Wildemount. The authoritarian regime of the Dwendalian Empire reacts the most harshly to the unique power of genasi, and the Cerberus Assembly takes the greatest interest in them. Genasi are often press-ganged into joining the assembly under threat of death or exile, and most accept the offer. Those who refuse—and who survive—often take refuge in the empire’s criminal underworld, with many finding acceptance in the Myriad crime syndicate.

Genasi on the Menagerie Coast

Even the cosmopolitan people of the Clovis Concord react to the sight of a genasi with wonder. Sailors and pirates alike take special interest in genasi, for the power to harness the elements is a gift from the gods on the open sea.

Genasi in Xhorhas

Powerful storms wrack the flat plains of Xhorhas, and many who live beyond the walls of the Kryn Dynasty’s cities pray to Kord the Storm Lord to win blessings and protection from his wrath. Air, fire, and water genasi are often born under Kord’s auspices, and many become shamans serving the folk of Xhorhas. Few earth genasi roam the wastes, though some are said to dwell within the Vermaloc Wildwood.

The Kryn know little about the genasi and are eager to rectify that. Their scouts have orders to bring back any genasi they encounter to Rosohna.

Genasi Names

Genasi use the naming conventions of the people among whom they were raised. They might later assume distinctive names to capture their heritage, such as Flame, Ember, Wave, or Onyx.

Genasi Traits

A genasi character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Constitution score increases by 2.

Age. Genasi mature at about the same rate as humans and reach adulthood in their late teens. They live somewhat longer than humans do, up to 120 years.

Alignment. Independent and self-reliant, genasi tend toward a neutral alignment.

Size. Genasi are as varied as their mortal parents but are generally built like humans. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d10

Height = 4 feet + 8 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 110 + (2d4 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Primordial. Primordial is a guttural language, filled with harsh syllables and hard consonants.

Genasi Subraces

There are four major subraces of genasi: air genasi, earth genasi, fire genasi, and water genasi. Choose one of these subraces.

Air Genasi

As an air genasi, you are descended from the djinn. As changeable as the weather, your moods shift from calm to wild and violent with little warning, but these storms rarely last long.

Air genasi typically have light blue skin, hair, and eyes. A faint but constant breeze accompanies them, tousling the hair and stirring the clothing. Some air genasi speak with breathy voices, marked by a faint echo. A few display odd patterns in their flesh.

Ability Score Increase. Your Dexterity score increases by 1.

Unending Breath. You can hold your breath indefinitely while you’re not incapacitated.

Mingle with the Wind. You can cast the levitate spell once with this trait, requiring no material components, and you regain the ability to cast it this way when you finish a long rest. Constitution is your spellcasting ability for this spell.

Earth Genasi

As an earth genasi, you are descended from the cruel and greedy dao, though you aren’t necessarily evil. You have inherited some measure of control over earth, reveling in superior strength and solid power. You tend to avoid rash decisions, pausing long enough to consider your options before taking action.

Elemental earth manifests differently from one individual to the next. Some earth genasi always have bits of dust falling from their bodies and mud clinging to their clothes, never getting clean no matter how often they bathe. Others are as shiny and polished as gemstones, with skin tones of deep brown or black, eyes sparkling like agates. Earth genasi can also have smooth metallic flesh, dull iron skin spotted with rust, a pebbled and rough hide, or even a coating of tiny embedded crystals.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 1.

Earth Walk. You can move across difficult terrain made of earth and stone without expending extra movement.

Pass without Trace. You can cast the pass without trace spell once with this trait, requiring no material components, and you regain the ability to cast it this way when you finish a long rest. Constitution is your spellcasting ability for this spell.

Fire Genasi

As a fire genasi, you have inherited the volatile mood and keen mind of the efreet. You tend toward impatience and making snap judgments. Rather than hide your distinctive appearance, you exult in it.

Nearly all fire genasi are feverishly hot as if burning inside, an impression reinforced by flaming red, coal-black, or ash-gray skin tones. The more human-looking have fiery red hair that writhes under extreme emotion, while more exotic specimens spot actual flames dancing on their heads. Fire genasi voices sound like crackling flames, and their eyes flare when angered. Some are accompanied by the faint scent of brimstone.

Ability Score Increase. Your Intelligence score increases by 1.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. Your ties to the Elemental Plane of Fire make your darkvision unusual: everything you see in darkness is a shade of red.

Fire Resistance. You have resistance to fire damage.

Reach to the Blaze. You know the produce flame cantrip. When you reach 3rd level, you can cast burning hands as a 1st-level spell once with this trait, and you regain the ability to cast it this way when you finish a long rest. Constitution is your spellcasting ability for these spells.

Water Genasi

The lapping of waves, the spray of sea foam on the wind, the ocean depths—these things call to your heart as a descendant of the turbulent marids. You wander freely and take pride in your independence, though others might consider you selfish.

Most water genasi look as if they just finished bathing, with beads of moisture collecting on their skin and hair. They smell of fresh rain and clean water. Blue or green skin is common, and most have somewhat overlarge eyes, blue-black in color. A water genasi’s hair might float freely, swaying and waving as if underwater. Some have voices with undertones reminiscent of whale song or trickling streams.

Ability Score Increase. Your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Acid Resistance. You have resistance to acid damage.

Amphibious. You can breathe air and water.

Swim. You have a swimming speed of 30 feet.

Call to the Wave. You know the shape water cantrip (see below). When you reach 3rd level, you can cast create or destroy water as a 2nd-level spell once with this trait, and you regain the ability to cast it this way when you finish a long rest. Constitution is your spellcasting ability for these spells.

Shape Water

Transmutation cantrip

Casting Time: 1 action

Range: 30 feet

Components: S

Duration: Instantaneous or 1 hour (see below)

You choose an area of water that you can see within range and that fits within a 5-foot cube. You manipulate it in one of the following ways:

  • You instantaneously move or otherwise change the flow of the water as you direct, up to 5 feet in any direction. This movement doesn’t have enough force to cause damage.
  • You cause the water to form into simple shapes and animate at your discretion. This change lasts for 1 hour.
  • You change the water’s color or opacity. The water must be changed in the same way throughout. This change lasts for 1 hour.
  • You freeze the water, provided that there are no creatures in it. The water unfreezes in 1 hour.

If you cast this spell multiple times, you can have no more than two of its non-instantaneous effects active at a time, and you can dismiss such an effect as an action.

Gnomes

Gnomes are not native to Wildemount, and are relatively uncommon even in an age of swift boats from Marquet and flying airships from Tal’Dorei. They hail from the distant continent of Issylra and were largely content to remain there after the Calamity. In lands inhabited by people taller and stronger than them, gnomes often resort to living exclusively among other gnomes for their own security. This attitude has kept the gnomes of Wildemount safe for generations, but it has also instilled many gnomish societies with a pernicious strain of xenophobia.

Gnomes in the Dwendalian Empire

Two major gnome ethnic groups exist within the Dwendalian Empire, one centered in the mountain-city of Hupperdook and the other in the wooded Velvin Thicket. The rock gnomes of Hupperdook originally settled the Silberquel Ridge, and formed their enclave as a defense against bandits and brigands who hunted their kind for sport. This settlement predated the rise of the empire, and after a long and unprecedented period of imperial diplomacy—rather than conquest—the Hupperdook gnomes were finally convinced to add their cultural knack for invention to the empire’s might.

The forest gnomes of the Velvin Thicket have resisted imperial takeover for decades. As a result, though most people in the empire see gnomes as their loyal friends and allies, many folk in the empire’s western reaches view gnomes as obstinate, backcountry hicks.

Gnomes on the Menagerie Coast

Large numbers of gnomes live within the Clovis Concord, primarily in the city of Gwardan, where a group of gnomes who seceded from Hupperdook settled before the Concord’s founding. Just as the elves of Gwardan were the metaphorical architects of the original concordance that founded the nation of city-states, the gnomes of Gwardan were the literal architects of the Clovis Concord’s magnificent cities and halls of governance. A rock gnome by the name of Ionia Marbleweaver is revered as the grandmother of Concordian art and architecture for her innovative use of columns, frescoes, and friezes, all of which feature prominently in the great buildings of the Menagerie Coast’s cities.

Gnomes in Xhorhas

Most Xhorhasians’ only contact with gnomes is a brief glimpse of a deep gnome scurrying about the Underdark carrying armfuls of gems. The deep gnomes have little interest in surface politics, and even try to stay neutral in the underground war between the Kryn Dynasty and the duergar rebels. For the most part, the deep gnomes and their settlements are small enough to remain unnoticed by larger folk.

Goblinkin

The civilized people of the world consider goblins to be nothing more than monsters—and in many ways, they’re right. Goblins and their cousins, the hobgoblins and bugbears, were first created by Bane, the Strife Emperor, as foot soldiers for his unholy army. Eons ago, when the flames of the Calamity burned across Exandria, the Betrayer Gods gathered in the realm that would eventually become Xhorhas. There, they found a people known as the dranassar. An ancestor race to the goblinoids, the dranassar were tall and beautiful, strong of body and mind, and fleet of foot. Their hair was thick and black, and their skin gleamed like gold. Most of the dranassar willingly served the divine beings that descended upon their land, but a few fought back against the Betrayer Gods’ rule.

Bane, a cruel tyrant even among the Betrayer Gods, smote the rebellious dranassar and twisted them into the goblinkin. When the armies of the Betrayer Gods wanted for skirmishers, Bane twisted the dranassar into goblins. When he was in need of loyal soldiers, he made them into hobgoblins. And when brute force was required, he sculpted them into bugbears. As the war of gods and mortals raged on, Bane corrupted even those dranassar who remained loyal to him.

The Betrayer Gods are long since defeated, but the goblinkin survived—leaderless, lost, and fallen into chaos. It is said that the voice of Bane still whispers into the minds of the goblinkin, goading them to commit senseless acts of cruelty against all they see.

Few goblins can steel their will against Bane’s foul whispers, but those who do live peaceful lives free of the god’s influence. Likewise, people who are transfigured into goblins or reborn as goblins do not hear the voice of Bane, and are free from his curse of strife.

Goblinkin in the Dwendalian Empire

Goblins living in Western Wynandir form small tribal groups and do their best to evade the vigilant eye of the imperial army. The fearsome soldiers of the Righteous Brand, known to the goblins as drohurror or "terrorfolk," are the greatest threat to the tribes. But with goblins treated as little better than vermin throughout the empire, any imperial citizen strong enough to wield a pitchfork can be a threat in their own right.

With most goblins in the empire tormented by Bane’s homicidal whispers, the people of the empire are just as fearful of goblinkin as the goblins are of them. Farmers and folk in rural regions such as the southern Marrow Valley take special precautions against goblin raids, and kill goblins on sight as if they were marauding animals. Even goblins who manage to free themselves of Bane’s influence are hard-pressed to overcome the fears of the empire’s rural folk. By contrast, city dwellers are rarely exposed to goblin raiders, and though they might react with suspicion and fear when seeing a goblin on the street, most are more accepting of the notion that not all goblins are evil.

Goblinkin on the Menagerie Coast

Goblins are a rare sight on the Menagerie Coast, so most folk who live there know of them only through folklore and stories told by travelers. With visitors from the Dwendalian Empire, the realms of Tal’Dorei, and Marquet common on the coast, most of those stories are tales of the vicious goblins of the Ravager horde of Tal’Dorei or the fearsome Duneburrow goblins of the far-off Marquesian deserts, painting a deeply unwholesome picture of goblinkin.

People living along the northern Menagerie Coast, in cities such as Gwardan, have firsthand accounts of the goblins and bugbears who have recently settled in the Lushgut Forest. Those who worship the Wild Mother in Gwardan have long seen the forest as one of her most sacred places, and initially reacted with fear to the forest’s "monstrous invaders." But with the bugbears and goblins having freed themselves of Bane’s corrupting influence through druidic meditation, they are slowly fostering friendship with the people of Gwardan.

GOBLINKIN AND THE CURSE OF STRIFE

The term "goblinkin" refers to three types of related peoples: goblins, hobgoblins, and bugbears. All three are affected by Bane’s curse of strife, allowing his foul voice to prey upon their minds from beyond the Divine Gate. Goblinkin who manage to overcome Bane’s curse are freed from the compulsion that leads them to evil. Unless the goblinkin was freed near birth, however, they have likely internalized their bias toward law, chaos, or neutrality, and might retain that aspect of their alignment even after the curse is broken.

It is nearly impossible for a goblinkin to break Bane’s curse on their own. Only those who undergo particularly traumatic events or are shown exceptional compassion typically find the inner strength to do so. Whenever a goblinkin returns to consciousness after being reduced to 0 hit points, they can make a DC 20 Wisdom saving throw, with advantage if they were brought back to life. On a success, the goblinkin breaks free from the curse of strife. A goblinkin targeted by remove curse can also make this saving throw, with advantage on the save if the caster is a trusted companion.

Many bugbears are cleansed of the curse from birth by a druidic order of bugbears who managed to break free from Bane’s influence decades ago. These bugbears never develop a chaotic, isolationist nature, and readily band together with druids and other defenders of the wilderness.

Goblins who suffer from the curse of strife are typically neutral evil, goaded by Bane to commit acts of wanton destruction and malice among the folk of the mortal races that opposed him in the Calamity. Hobgoblins afflicted by the curse of strife are almost exclusively lawful evil, and are urged toward acts of conquest. Their societies are regimented like military dictatorships, and hobgoblin despots are the scourges of whole nations. Bugbears who suffer under Bane’s influence are typically chaotic evil, and are commanded to isolate themselves from all bonds and ties of camaraderie so as to maximize the suffering of those they brutalize.

Goblinkin in Xhorhas

Goblins, hobgoblins, and bugbears are a common sight in Xhorhas, especially around Rosohna—for it was here that Bane first created the goblinkin from the noble dranassar. The people of the Kryn Dynasty have made efforts to forge close ties with the goblinkin who have made their home in the region, and have even managed to subvert the curse of strife by the power of the Luxon. Any creature reborn into a goblinkin body is born without the curse, and any natural-born goblin born within one hundred miles of a Luxon beacon is likewise shielded from Bane’s seed of corruption.

Bugbear Racial Traits

A bugbear character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Dexterity score increases by 1.

Age. Bugbears reach adulthood at age 16 and live up to 80 years.

Alignment. Bugbears value self-sufficiency and violence. They are generally chaotic, organizing in loose tribes under charismatic and powerful leaders.

Size. Bugbears are between 6 and 8 feet tall and weigh between 250 and 350 pounds. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d12

Height = 6 feet + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 200 + (2d6 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Long-Limbed. When you make a melee attack on your turn, your reach for it is 5 feet greater than normal.

Powerful Build. You count as one size larger when determining your carrying capacity and the weight you can push, drag, or lift.

Sneaky. You are proficient in the Stealth skill.

Surprise Attack. If you surprise a creature and hit it with an attack on your first turn in combat, the attack deals an extra 2d6 damage to it. You can use this trait only once per combat.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Goblin.

Goblin Racial Traits

A goblin character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Dexterity score increases by 2, and your Constitution score increases by 1.

Age. Goblins reach adulthood at age 8 and live up to 60 years.

Alignment. Goblins tend to look out for themselves, preferably without drawing unwanted attention from any larger and more powerful people.

Size. Goblins are between 3 and 4 feet tall and weigh between 40 and 80 pounds. Your size is Small. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d4

Height = 3 feet + 5 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 35 + your size modifier

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Fury of the Small. When you damage a creature with an attack or a spell and the creature’s size is larger than yours, you can cause the attack or spell to deal extra damage to the creature. The extra damage equals your level. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Nimble Escape. You can take the Disengage or Hide action as a bonus action on each of your turns.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Goblin.

Hobgoblin Racial Traits

A hobgoblin character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Constitution score increases by 2, and your Intelligence score increases by 1.

Age. Hobgoblins mature at the same rate as humans and have lifespans similar in length to theirs.

Alignment. Hobgoblins adhere to a strict code of honor and a rigid idea of martial discipline. Most are lawful, tending toward harsh enforcement of their laws.

Size. Hobgoblins are between 5 and 6 feet tall and weigh between 150 and 200 pounds. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d10

Height = 4 feet + 8 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 110 + (2d4 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Martial Training. You are proficient with two martial weapons of your choice and with light armor.

Saving Face. Hobgoblins are careful not to show weakness in front of their allies, for fear of losing status. If you miss with an attack roll or fail an ability check or a saving throw, you can gain a bonus to the roll equal to the number of allies you can see within 30 feet of you (maximum bonus of +5). Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Goblin.

Goliaths

The goliaths of Exandria are a mighty people with stone giant blood running in their veins. Most stand well over seven feet tall and are blessed with a naturally powerful physique. Like their stone giant progenitors, goliaths are a rare sight in Wildemount. Most live on isolated peaks in the Cyrios Mountains, the Penumbra Range, and on the isolated land of Eiselcross. Those few goliaths who are exiled from their herds and wander into more densely peopled lands are uniformly greeted with fear and confusion.

Goliaths have a compulsion to compete and keep score, counting their deeds and tallying their accomplishments to compare to others. Goliaths love to win, but they see defeat as a prod to improve their skills. Above all else, they are driven to outdo their past efforts. Few goliaths reach old age, as most die attempting to surpass their past achievements.

Among goliaths, any adult who can’t or won’t contribute to the herd is expelled. A lone goliath has little chance of survival, especially an older or weaker one. Goliaths have little pity for adults who can’t take care of themselves, though a sick or injured individual is treated, as a result of the goliath concept of fair play.

Goliath Names

Every goliath has three names: a birth name assigned by the newborn’s mother and father, a nickname assigned by the herd’s chief, and a family or herd name.

Goliath Birth Names: Aukan, Eglath, Gauthak, Ilikan, Keothi, Kuori, Lo-Kag, Manneo, Maveith, Nalla, Orilo, Pethani, Thalai, Thotham, Uthal, Vaunea, Vimak

Goliath Nicknames: Bearkiller, Fearless, Horncarver, Keeneye, Lonehunter, Rootsmasher, Steadyhand, Twice-Orphaned, Twistedlimb, Wordpainter

Goliath Herds: Anakalathai, Elanithino, Gathakanathi, Kalagiano, Katho-Olavi, Kolae-Gileana, Ogolakanu, Thuliaga, Thunukalathi, Vaimei-Laga

Goliath Traits

A goliath character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Constitution score increases by 1.

Age. Goliaths have lifespans comparable to humans. They enter adulthood in their late teens and usually live less than a century.

Alignment. Goliath society, with its clear roles and tasks, has a strong lawful bent. The goliath sense of fairness, balanced with an emphasis on self-sufficiency and personal accountability, pushes them toward neutrality.

Size. Goliaths stand between 7 and 8 feet tall and weigh between 280 and 340 pounds. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d10

Height = 6 feet + 2 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 200 + (2d6 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Natural Athlete. You have proficiency in the Athletics skill.

Stone’s Endurance. You can focus yourself to occasionally shrug off injury. When you take damage, you can use your reaction to roll a d12. Add your Constitution modifier to the number rolled, and reduce the damage by that total. After you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you finish a short or long rest.

Powerful Build. You count as one size larger when determining your carrying capacity and the weight you can push, drag, or lift.

Mountain Born. You’re acclimated to high altitude, including elevations above 20,000 feet. You’re also naturally adapted to cold climates, as described in chapter 5 of the Dungeon Master’s Guide.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Giant.

Half-Elves

Half-elves occupy all lands where humans and elves gather. In ancient times, the appearance of half-elves was a cause for alarm in elven society, for prejudiced elves saw the union between elves and humans as a symptom of impurity in their blood and culture. Such attitudes have cooled across the continent in recent centuries, and most elven societies now feature a diverse array of people—notably the pluralistic union of dwarves and elves in the city-state of Uthodurn and the diverse peoples of the Kryn Dynasty.

Half-Elves in the Dwendalian Empire

The Dwendalian Empire sees half-elves as a sign that imperial rule is healthy, and that people are traveling across and strengthening the bonds of its disparate provinces. However, this belief is less pervasive in the elven enclave of Bysaes Tyl, which was coerced into joining the empire decades ago. The elves of Bysaes Tyl are dedicated to maintaining a tenuous grasp on their lost realm of Molaesmyr, and any elf who bears a non-elf child is considered a traitor to their ancient culture.

Half-Elves on the Menagerie Coast

In some ways, the Clovis Concord can be considered a half-elf nation, founded as it was by the native human Ki’Nau people and by elf and human settlers from Marquet. Half-elves are also a common sight arriving on passenger ships from Tal’Dorei. The elves of Syngorn, the center of elven culture in Tal’Dorei, still hold a shameful and outdated view of their half-elf children, many of whom seek passage or stow away on ships to the Menagerie Coast to start new lives.

Half-Elves in Xhorhas

Half-elves of all different ancestries dwell within the lands of the Kryn, with most having one dark elf parent. The idea of elves forming relationships and even having children with people of other humanoid races has long since been accepted throughout Kryn lands—so much so that it seems somewhat unnatural when people outside the culture express surprise at half-elves with small, minotaur-like horns, or with the tufted ears and yellow eyes of a bugbear.

Kenku

In ancient times, kenku were black-winged angels—ambassadors who served the Raven Queen as her emissaries of death. Their voices were once heard across entire planes, calling the dead to the Raven Queen’s embrace. The kenku likewise served as her loyal warriors in the Calamity, and even saved her from a near-fatal encounter with the Betrayer God known as Tharizdun.

Though the kenku saved the Raven Queen from oblivion, all of her black-winged emissaries were consumed by Tharizdun’s infinite void. For long years, the kenku were thought to have been annihilated, and it was only when Tharizdun was defeated and chained by the god Ioun near the Calamity’s end that they were freed.

When the gods sealed themselves behind the Divine Gate, the Raven Queen realized what her emissaries had sacrificed to save her. Though the kenku survived oblivion, they returned as mortals, stripped of all the divine gifts their god had bestowed on them: their voices, their wings, and all memories of their past existence. Bearing Tharizdun’s curse of oblivion, the kenku were reduced to squat beings that could speak only by mimicking the words of others.

Kenku exist across Wildemount in small numbers. Considered by most to be monsters, they keep to themselves as a result, always longing for something they can neither ask for nor explain. Something in a kenku’s mind stirs when it looks to the sky and see birds flying freely—an ancient longing, and a memory trapped within oblivion.

ROLEPLAYING A KENKU

If you’re playing a kenku, constant attempts to mimic voices can come across as confusing or irritating rather than entertaining. You can just as easily describe the sounds your character makes and what they mean. Be clear about your character’s intentions unless you’re deliberately aiming for inscrutable or mysterious.

You might say, “Snapper makes the noise of a hammer slowly and rhythmically tapping a stone to show how bored he is. He plays with his dagger and studies the Cobalt Soul agent sitting at the bar.” Creating a vocabulary of noises for the other players to decode might sound like fun, but it can prove distracting and could slow down the game.

Kenku Names

Kenku names are drawn from a staggering variety of noises and phrases. Kenku names tend to break down into three categories that make no distinction between male and female names.

Kenku thugs, warriors, and toughs adopt noises made by weapons, such as the clang of a mace against armor or the sound made by a breaking bone. Non-kenku refer to the kenku by describing this noise. Sample names include Smasher, Clanger, Slicer, and Basher.

Kenku thieves, con artists, and burglars adopt animal noises, typically those common in urban settings. In this manner, kenku can call out to each other while those who overhear them mistake them for common animals. Non-kenku use names that refer to the sound made or the animal a kenku mimics, such as Rat Scratch, Whistler, Mouser, and Growler.

Some kenku are law-abiding and pursue legitimate trades. These kenku adopt noises made as part of their craft. A sailor duplicates the sound of a fluttering sail, while a smith mimics the clanging of a hammer on metal. Non-kenku describe these folk by their trade sounds, such as Sail Snap, Hammerer, and Cutter.

Kenku Traits

A kenku character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Dexterity score increases by 2, and your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Age. Kenku have shorter lifespans than humans. They reach maturity at about 12 years old and can live to 60.

Alignment. Kenku are chaotic creatures, rarely making enduring commitments, and they care mostly for preserving their own hides. They are generally chaotic neutral in outlook.

Size. Kenku are around 5 feet tall and weigh between 90 and 120 pounds. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d8

Height = 4 feet + 4 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 50 + (1d6 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Expert Forgery. You can duplicate other creatures’ handwriting and craftwork. You have advantage on all checks made to produce forgeries or duplicates of existing objects.

Kenku Training. You are proficient in your choice of two of the following skills: Acrobatics, Deception, Stealth, and Sleight of Hand.

Mimicry. You can mimic sounds you have heard, including voices. A creature that hears the sounds you make can tell they are imitations with a successful Wisdom (Insight) check contested by your Charisma (Deception) check.

Languages. You can read and write Auran and Common, but you can speak only by using your Mimicry trait.

Orcs and Half-Orcs

The first half-orcs in Wildemount were born of a union between human warriors and orc traitors in the final days of the Calamity. Orcs are one of Exandria’s youngest races, and are said to have been born from elves seared by the blood of Gruumsh, the Ruiner, when Corellon pierced the orc god’s eye on the field of battle. For long years, orcs were feared as mindless abominations, drawn to slaughter like moths to flame.

Stories tell of how the blood of the Ruiner flows in the veins of all orcs, driving them to commit acts of terrible violence and anger. Orcs call this fury hgar’Gruum, or the curse of ruin, and use it to refer to everything from battle rage to a bad temper. Half-orcs are said to have inherited the blood of the Ruiner, and to carry the same bloodlust and fury that orcs do.

Orcs and half-orcs do feel a certain pull toward violence and anger. But the simple truth is that there is no curse of ruin. No supernatural power drives orcs to kill. Rather, they are simply victims of the same selfish, violent impulses that corrupt all mortal beings.

Half-Orcs in the Dwendalian Empire

The orcish settlement of Bladegarden was incorporated into the Dwendalian Empire after the fall of the Julous Dominion, nearly three hundred years ago. Orcs are now renowned as some of the empire’s most accomplished soldiers, though many folk still fear the ancient legends of the curse of ruin.

Half-orcs are proud of their heritage, though many are wary of the wrathful curse that supposedly drives them to violence. Those who embrace this gift of fury often enlist in the Righteous Brand to focus their rage against the enemies of the empire. Other half-orcs reject the idea that they are destined for violence, and rely on faith, meditation, and friendship to live peaceful lives.

Half-Orcs on the Menagerie Coast

The folk of the Clovis Concord welcome people of all kinds to their shores, yet orcs and half-orcs are uncommon in Concordian cities. Most half-orcs on the Menagerie Coast come from the continent of Tal’Dorei as visitors, merchants, or mercenaries, and rarely settle. Half-orc children in the settlements of the coast are often bullied for their unusual teeth.

Only the Concordian city of Othe has a significant half-orc population. Originally established as a spiritual site for the Ki’Nau people, the city has long attracted orcs and half-orcs who believe that the curse of ruin has caused them to lash out at those they love. In Othe, they find peace through spiritualism—and a place to belong.

Half-Orcs in Xhorhas

The orcs of Xhorhas are a predominantly nomadic people, living in mixed clans of orcs, humans, and bugbears. They wander the wastes, taming the indigenous beasts and trading with Kryn settlements. The relationship between the orcs and the Kryn is relatively peaceful, though many nomadic orcs are angered when Kryn souls are reborn in orc bodies. These orcs nonetheless readily accept Kryn into their roving clans, seeing it as a point of pride that a city dweller has been drawn to a more exciting life in the chaos of the wastes.

Most half-orcs in Xhorhas have human or drow blood. In the culture of the Xhorhasian nomads, the union of orcs and goblinkin is strictly taboo, for the clans’ elders fear the uncontrolled madness of a soul afflicted by both Gruumsh’s curse of ruin and Bane’s curse of strife.

Orc Traits

Exandrian orcs are not bound to commit acts of evil by nature. An orc character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Constitution score increases by 1.

Age. Orcs reach adulthood at age 16, and live up to 80 years.

Alignment. Orcs fear the curse of ruin that is said to plague their race, and tend strongly toward either chaos (accepting their fate), or toward law (rejecting it).

Size. Orcs stand easily 8 feet tall and corded with powerful muscles, weighing up to 280 pounds. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d8

Height = 5 feet + 4 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 175 + (2d6 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Aggressive. As a bonus action, you can move up to your speed toward an enemy of your choice that you can see or hear. You must end this move closer to the enemy than you started.

Powerful Build. You count as one size larger when determining your carrying capacity and the weight you can push, drag, or lift.

Primal Intuition. You have proficiency in two skills of your choice from the following list: Animal Handling, Insight, Intimidation, Medicine, Perception, and Survival.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and Orc.

Tabaxi

The catlike tabaxi are an agile, witty, and playful folk who have long lived among the indigenous Ki’Nau people of the Menagerie Coast and in the cold northern forests of the Greying Wildlands. Said to have been born from the dreams of Melora within the jungles of Wildemount’s more temperate regions, they are natural hunters with keen senses and predatory instincts. The tabaxi of Exandria are also well known for their social guile. Many are taken with a love of wordplay and debate, often engaging travelers in philosophical conversations meant to challenge the intellect and to subtly gauge the disposition of strangers.

Tabaxi can be found in small numbers throughout Wildemount and are generally well thought of. Some make up small clans in the wilderness beyond the boundaries of Wildemount’s major societies. Others are content to stand out among the other folk of those larger nations. Deft at crafts, hunting, and commercial enterprises, many tabaxi find themselves drawn toward an entrepreneurial existence, while some fall naturally into the more dangerous pursuits of an adventurer’s lifestyle.

Politics hold a conversational curiosity for some, but only a few tabaxi are driven enough to ascend to positions of political power, most commonly along the Menagerie Coast. Even so, most catfolk are happier away from the limelight, slyly convincing others to visibly take the risks for them.

Fleeting Fancies

Wandering tabaxi are mercurial creatures, trading one obsession or passion for the next as the whim strikes. A tabaxi’s desire burns bright, but once met it disappears to be replaced with a new obsession. Objects remain intriguing only as long as they still hold secrets.

A tabaxi rogue could happily spend months plotting to steal a strange gem from a noble, only to trade it for passage on a ship or a week’s lodging after stealing it. The tabaxi might even take extensive notes or memorize every facet of the gem before passing it on, but the gem holds no more allure once its secrets and nature have been laid bare.

Tabaxi Names

Each tabaxi has a single name, determined by clan and based on a complex formula that involves astrology, prophecy, clan history, and other esoteric factors. Tabaxi names can apply to all genders, and most use nicknames derived from or inspired by their full names. Clan names are usually based on a geographical feature located in or near the clan’s territory.

The following list of sample tabaxi names includes nicknames in parentheses.

Tabaxi Names: Cloud on the Mountaintop (Cloud), Five Timber (Timber), Flask of Wine (Flask), Jade Shoe (Jade), Left-Handed Hummingbird (Bird), Seven Thundercloud (Thunder), Skirt of Snakes (Snake), Smoking Mirror (Smoke)

Tabaxi Clans: Bright Cliffs, Distant Rain, Mountain Tree, Red Butterfly, Rumbling River, Snoring Mountain

Tabaxi Traits

A tabaxi character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Dexterity score increases by 2, and your Charisma score increases by 1.

Age. Tabaxi have lifespans equivalent to humans.

Alignment. Tabaxi tend toward chaotic alignments, as they let impulse and fancy guide their decisions. They are rarely evil, with most of them driven by curiosity rather than greed and other dark impulses.

Size. Tabaxi are taller on average than humans and relatively slender. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d10

Height = 4 feet + 10 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 90 + (2d4 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Darkvision. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in darkness, only shades of gray.

Feline Agility. Your reflexes and agility allow you to move with a burst of speed. When you move on your turn in combat, you can double your speed until the end of the turn. Once you use this trait, you can’t use it again until you move 0 feet on one of your turns.

Cat’s Claws. Because of your claws, you have a climbing speed of 20 feet. In addition, your claws are natural weapons, which you can use to make unarmed strikes. If you hit with them, you deal slashing damage equal to 1d4 + your Strength modifier, instead of the bludgeoning damage normal for an unarmed strike.

Cat’s Talent. You have proficiency in the Perception and Stealth skills.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Common and one other language of your choice.

Tieflings

Centuries have passed since the tieflings first faced persecution for their fiendish heritage in the Age of Arcanum. Although a certain mystique still surrounds their kind, most people in Wildemount grew up alongside tieflings, and the tides of war have brought tiefling soldiers, merchants, and entertainers into even the most rural and isolated regions of the continent. For the most part, only overzealously devout paladins and folk raised on the dark tales of an ancient age might actively wish harm on tieflings.

Exandrian tieflings have a wide array of skin tones, all of them vibrant and colorful. The most common hue is a deep crimson, but shades of purple, blue, green, and even yellow and pink have been seen throughout the world. It’s not known what causes these variations, as even tiefling parents with the same skin tone can have children of wildly different colors.

Tieflings in the Dwendalian Empire

Most imperial tieflings live in the cities of the empire or in small communes in the countryside. Many are encouraged by their parents to join the Crownsguard or the Righteous Brand to valiantly serve the empire, and a direct connection can be drawn between the tieflings’ ancient persecution and their focus on military service. Centuries ago, countless tieflings joined the armies of the Julous Dominion in hopes of winning glory and proving themselves the equals of their oppressors. Over time, many found acceptance in the eyes of the Julous people and its government, eventually becoming hardline loyalists of the Julous Dominion. Their spirits were thus crushed when the dominion fell to the mighty armies of the invading Dwendalian Empire.

Three generations have passed since the fall of the dominion, and many adult tieflings still remember the war stories their grandparents told them as children. The empire’s propagandists have been quick to capitalize on this, stoking a hunger for glory that sees the lives of eager tieflings fuel the imperial war machine.

Tieflings on the Menagerie Coast

Tieflings’ extravagant skin tones and striking horns are considered attractive in the culture of the Clovis Concord, and many tieflings have capitalized on this reaction to become entertainers. Some of the best-known tiefling actors, gladiators, and musicians found their start on the Menagerie Coast—as have innumerable entertainers of the bawdier sort, including the prominent Nicodranas courtesan known as Ruby of the Sea. Many such performers have gone on to perform at the court of King Bertrand Dwendal, or to tour the distant lands of Tal’Dorei and Marquet.

Tieflings in Xhorhas

Some legends talk of how the first tieflings were born in Ghor Dranas. Asmodeus, Lord of the Nine Hells, is said to have tempted a number of that city’s original inhabitants into tying their bloodlines to his own infernal power in exchange for magical knowledge. Though the truth of the tale is impossible to confirm, Rosohna maintains a significant tiefling population, and tieflings are a common sight in Kryn society.

Tortles

For centuries, the people of Xhorhas and the Dwendalian Empire believed tortles to be a hoax concocted by Concordian hucksters. In truth, tortles are an ancient and long-lived people who dwell within the jungles and along the beaches of the Menagerie Coast. Most tortles who journey far from the coast begin to feel pangs of homesickness, which can develop into a depression.

Tortles are almost unheard of beyond the sunny shores of the Menagerie Coast.

Life of a Tortle

A tortle hatches from a thick-shelled egg and spends the first few weeks of its life crawling on all fours. Its parents, old and near death, spend what little time they have left telling stories to their offspring. Within a year, the young tortle becomes an orphan, though not before it learns to speak and to survive on its own.

A young tortle and its siblings inherit whatever tools, weapons, and gifts their parents left behind. Each young tortle is expected to fend for itself. It leaves the place of its birth and finds its own corner of the wilderness in which to hunt, catch fish, and get by. With each passing year, a tortle hones its survival skills. It forms friendships with its neighbors while also respecting their privacy. At some point, a tortle feels an urge to see more of the world. It gathers up its gear and travels, returning months or years later with stories of its exploits.

When a tortle nears the end of its lifespan, it seeks out a mate. Tortles lay their eggs (numbering as few as one or as many as a dozen) in a fortified compound. If no such compound exists, they build one. The parents spend the remainder of their lives guarding it, defending their offspring, and sharing their knowledge. When the children grow up, they pick up whatever weapons and tools their parents left behind and set out on their own.

Tortle Names

Tortles prefer non-gender-specific names that are usually no more than two syllables. Tortles don’t have surnames or family names.

Male and Female Names: Baka, Damu, Gar, Gura, Ini, Jappa, Kinlek, Krull, Lim, Lop, Nortle, Nulka, Olo, Ploqwat, Quee, Queg, Quott, Sunny, Tibor, Ubo, Uhok, Wabu, Xelbuk, Xopa, Yog

Tortle Traits

A tortle character has the following racial traits.

Ability Score Increase. Your Strength score increases by 2, and your Wisdom score increases by 1.

Age. Young tortles crawl for a few weeks after birth before learning to walk on two legs. They reach adulthood by the age of 15 and live an average of 50 years.

Alignment. Tortles tend to lead orderly, ritualistic lives. They develop routines, becoming more set in their ways as they age. Most are lawful good. A few can be selfish and greedy, tending more toward evil, but it’s unusual for a tortle to shuck off order in favor of chaos.

Size. Tortle adults stand 5 to 6 feet tall and average about 450 pounds. Their shells account for roughly one-third of their weight. Your size is Medium. Here’s how to determine your height and weight randomly, starting with rolling a size modifier:

Size modifier = 2d8

Height = 4 feet + 10 inches + your size modifier in inches

Weight in pounds = 400 + (2d4 × your size modifier)

Speed. Your base walking speed is 30 feet.

Claws. Your claws are natural weapons, which you can use to make unarmed strikes. If you hit with them, you deal slashing damage equal to 1d4 + your Strength modifier, instead of the bludgeoning damage normal for an unarmed strike.

Hold Breath. You can hold your breath for up to 1 hour at a time. Tortles aren’t natural swimmers, but they can remain underwater for some time before needing to come up for air.

Natural Armor. Due to your shell and the shape of your body, you are ill-suited to wearing armor. Your shell provides ample protection, however; it gives you a base AC of 17 (your Dexterity modifier doesn’t affect this number). You gain no benefit from wearing armor, but if you are using a shield, you can apply the shield’s bonus as normal.

Shell Defense. You can withdraw into your shell as an action. Until you emerge, you gain a +4 bonus to AC, and you have advantage on Strength and Constitution saving throws. While in your shell, you are prone, your speed is 0 and can’t increase, you have disadvantage on Dexterity saving throws, you can’t take reactions, and the only action you can take is a bonus action to emerge from your shell.

Survival Instinct. You gain proficiency in the Survival skill. Tortles have finely honed survival instincts.

Languages. You can speak, read, and write Aquan and Common.

Hollow One

The eastern coast of Xhorhas, known to the Kryn as Blightshore, is a land scarred by evil magic. Among the creations of that foul place are the Hollow Ones, beings whose souls have left for the afterlife, yet whose bodies still retain a fragment of their former selves.

The magic that sustains Hollow Ones is a mystery. Most Hollow Ones are reborn after dying in Blightshore, suggesting that the spell-scarred nature of the land brought them back for an unknown purpose. Yet some beings find that, days after they died, they awaken, clutching to life, with only a terrible emptiness inside to remind them of their death.

In Blightshore, Hollow Ones are seen as a people like any other. They seem strange, but the adventurous and hardy folk of Blightshore are used to making allies with strange creatures. Elsewhere, Hollow Ones are indistinguishable from living creatures, save for the faint stench of necromancy that lingers about them.

The transition from life to becoming a Hollow One affects different people to different degrees. Some let their anger and regret consume them. Others use their second chance to become a brighter force in the world. However, all Hollow Ones are marked by their new existence: feelings of unease, dread or sadness cling to them like tattered rags of their past life.

Supernatural Gift: Hollow One

The Dungeon Master has the option to allow a character created in a Wildemount campaign to be a Hollow One. Alternatively, a character who perishes in the course of a campaign might return as a Hollow One, created by the mysterious forces that scar the land.

As a Hollow One, the void left behind by your departed soul is filled with the strange magic of Blightshore. Becoming a Hollow One is a supernatural gift (see "Supernatural Gifts" in chapter 7 of the Dungeon Master’s Guide) that bestows upon you the following traits.

Ageless. You don’t age, and effects that would cause you to age don’t work on you.

Cling to Life. When you make a death saving throw and roll 16 or higher, you regain 1 hit point.

Revenance. You retain your creature type, yet you register as undead to spells and other effects that detect the presence of the undead creature type.

Unsettling Presence. As an action, you can unsettle a creature you can see within 15 feet of you. The target has disadvantage on the next saving throw it makes within the next minute. Constructs, undead, and creatures that can’t be frightened are immune to this feature. Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.